August 10, 2020

24,000 Square Foot French-Inspired Stone Mansion In Mill Neck, NY


Designed by Gallagher, Homburger & Gonzalez Architects and built in 2013, this French-inspired mega mansion in Mill Neck, NY is situated on eight acres of land in the heart of Horseshoe Road enclave. The stone residence features approximately 24,000 square feet of living space with seven bedrooms and 10 full and one half bathrooms.

There is also a two-story foyer with floating double staircase, an elevator, formal living room with fireplace, formal dining room, a butler's pantry, a chef-inspired gourmet kitchen with breakfast area, family room with fireplace, wood-paneled home office with fireplace, 2,000-bottle wine cellar, billiards room, a 12-seat home theater with concession area and wet bar, home gym, sauna, temperature-controlled indoor swimming pool with spa, six-car garage, and much more. Outdoor features include a gated entrance, a porte-cochere, two motor courts, fountain, expansive terraces, BBQ kitchen, swimming pool, courtyard with reflecting pool, a two-story green house, formal gardens, and a pond.




















ADDRESS: 102 Horseshoe Road, Mill Neck, NY 11765

YEAR BUILT: 2013

SQUARE FEET: 24,000

BEDROOMS: 7

BATHROOMS: 10 full, 1 half

LIST PRICE: $17,400,000

LISTING AGENT(S): Spencer Ting of The Corcoran Group


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2 comments:

  1. Is there an architect left in North America that understands that a 24K square foot mansion with a $17 million budget ought to have 2-story ceilings over its important public rooms, and not just in the foyer? Shouldn't the living room, dining room and home office be at least marginally monumental?

    The indoor pool is magnificent, if oversized, the outdoor pool is superfluous - this is NY after all, the summer swimming season is measured in days, not months. Given the often inclement weather, a proper covered loggia would have been preferable to DUMBASS open terraces which can only be enjoyed under ideal conditions, which are rare enough.

    Why do I have to think of everything?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As always, I appreciate your brutally honest assessments! Thank you for stopping by and I look forward to hearing more of your feedback on future posts.

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